English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Talk

The plasticity of empathy, compassion and mentalizing: Neural networks and training effects after 9-Month of contemplative training

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons19764

Kanske,  Philipp
Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Kanske, P. (2016). The plasticity of empathy, compassion and mentalizing: Neural networks and training effects after 9-Month of contemplative training. Talk presented at European Summer Research Institute (ESRI). Chiemsee, Germany. 2016-08-22 - 2016-08-28.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-3358-7
Abstract
Social capacities like empathy, compassion and mentalizing (also termed Theory of Mind) enable us to successfully interact with one another. This presentation will first delineate the neural networks underlying these functions, with anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsal/anterior temporoparietal junction, and striatal regions for socio-affective skills and ventral/posterior temporoparietal junction, superior temporal gyrus, temporal poles, and anterior and posterior midline regions for socio-cognitive functioning. Second, malleability of these capacities will be described within the longitudinal ReSource Project, which trained participants in three separate modules (Presence, Affect, and Perspective). While the Affect module (focusing on cultivating compassion and prosocial motivation) mainly increased participants’ reports of compassion towards others, the Perspective module (focusing on perspective-taking on self and others) selectively enhanced performance in mentalizing. This behavioral improvement was associated with increased cortical thickness in the respective neural networks after each module suggesting not only plasticity on the functional brain and behavioral level but also on the structural brain level. The findings bear relevance for interventions in clinical, educational, and corporate settings aiming at cultivating social competence and cooperation.