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Rippling Patterns in Aggregates of Myxobacteria Arise from Cell-Cell Collisions

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Börner,  U.
Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Deutsch,  A.
Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Bär,  M.
Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Börner, U., Deutsch, A., Reichenbach, H., & Bär, M. (2002). Rippling Patterns in Aggregates of Myxobacteria Arise from Cell-Cell Collisions. Physical Review Letters, 89(7): 078101. Retrieved from http://ojps.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=PRLTAO000089000007078101000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-371D-F
Abstract
Experiments with myxobacterial aggregates reveal standing waves called rippling patterns. Here these structures are modeled with a simple discrete model based on the interplay between migration and collisions of cells. Head-to-head collisions of cells result in cell reversals. To correctly reproduce the rippling patterns, a refractory phase after each cell reversal has to be assumed, during which further reversal is prohibited. The duration of this phase determines the wavelength and period of the ripple patterns as well as the reversal frequency of single cells.