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Substrate and product structural requirements for binding of nucleotides to H-ras p21: the mechanism of discrimination between guanosine and adenosine nucleotides

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John,  Jiss
Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Schlichting,  Ilme
Department of Biomolecular Mechanisms, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Rensland, H., John, J., Linke, R., Simon, I., Schlichting, I., Wittinghofer, A., et al. (1995). Substrate and product structural requirements for binding of nucleotides to H-ras p21: the mechanism of discrimination between guanosine and adenosine nucleotides. Biochemistry, 34(2), 593-599. doi:10.1021/bi00002a026.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-4DF2-9
Abstract
The interaction of the protein product of the H-ras oncogene with a series of nucleoside di- and triphosphates has been examined to investigate the tolerance of the active site to departures from the GTP or GDP structures. Nucleotides which bind relatively strongly could be used as competitors of GDP in a simple filter binding assay to give semiquantitave estimates of their affinities. For more weakly binding nucleotides or to obtain quantitative data, a transient kinetic method was used which was based on determination of the association and dissociation rate constants. The results obtained indicate that substantial modification of the sugar or phosphate structure is tolerated with little or moderate loss of affinity, but that large losses in affinity occur on modification of the base structure. In particular, replacing the guanine by an adenine residue leads to a dramatic loss of affinity. Thus, discrimination against ATP and ADP is very high (relative affinities of ATP and GTP 1:10(7)). This is due not only to loss of positive (stabilizing) interactions, but especially to the introduction of negative ones.