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Substrate-assisted catalysis as a mechanism for GTP hydrolysis of p21ras and other GTP-binding proteins

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Geyer,  Matthias
Emeritus Group Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Scheffzek,  Klaus
Emeritus Group Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Kalbitzer,  Hans Robert
Emeritus Group Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Wittinghofer,  Alfred
Emeritus Group Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Schweins, T., Geyer, M., Scheffzek, K., Warshel, A., Kalbitzer, H. R., & Wittinghofer, A. (1995). Substrate-assisted catalysis as a mechanism for GTP hydrolysis of p21ras and other GTP-binding proteins. Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, 2(1), 36-44. doi:10.1038/nsb0195-36.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-4FBE-2
Abstract
Despite many advances in understanding the structure and function of GTP-binding proteins the mechanism by which these molecules switch from the GTP-bound on-state to the GDP-bound off-state is still poorly understood. Theoretical studies suggest that the activation of the nucleophilic water which hydrolyzes GTP needs a general base. Such a base could not be located in any of the many GTP-binding proteins. Here we present a unique type of linear free energy relationships that not only supports a mechanism for p21ras in which the substrate GTP itself acts as the catalytic base driving the GTPase reaction but can also help to explain why certain mutants of p21ras are oncogenic and others are not.