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Poly(ionic liquid)-mediated morphogenesis of bismuth sulfide with a tunable band gap and enhanced electrocatalytic properties

MPS-Authors

Gao,  Min-Rui
Jiayin Yuan, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Yuan,  Jiayin
Jiayin Yuan, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Zhang,  Weiyi
Jiayin Yuan, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Antonietti,  Markus
Markus Antonietti, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Gao, M.-R., Yu, S.-H., Yuan, J., Zhang, W., & Antonietti, M. (2016). Poly(ionic liquid)-mediated morphogenesis of bismuth sulfide with a tunable band gap and enhanced electrocatalytic properties. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 55(41), 12812-12816. doi:10.1002/anie.201607221.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-603B-F
Abstract
Conventional polymer additives have a substantial impact on synthetic inorganic chemistry, but critical shortcomings remain; for example, low solubility in organic solvents and potential thermodynamic aggregates. Poly(ionic liquid)s have now been used as efficient additives that enable a high level control of bismuth sulfide crystals with significant size and morphological diversities. The bismuth sulfides exhibit tunable band structure as a result of the quantum size effects. Moreover, poly(ionic liquid)s are able to couple with as-synthesized bismuth sulfides chemically and endow a modified surface electronic structure, which allows resultant products to possess outstanding electrocatalytic performance for water oxidation, although its commercial counterpart is catalytically inert.