English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

New organic semiconducting scaffolds by supramolecular preorganization : dye intercalation and dye oxidation and reduction

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons199070

Li,  Lina
Menny Shalom, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons199072

Zhao,  Yubao
Menny Shalom, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons1057

Antonietti,  Markus
Markus Antonietti, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons121860

Shalom,  Menny
Menny Shalom, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
Citation

Li, L., Zhao, Y., Antonietti, M., & Shalom, M. (2016). New organic semiconducting scaffolds by supramolecular preorganization: dye intercalation and dye oxidation and reduction. Small, 12(44), 6090-6097. doi:10.1002/smll.201602445.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-7826-D
Abstract
The assembly of melamine and 2,5-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone results in new “sheet-like” supramolecular crystals that by controlled thermal condensation can be converted to photoactive materials at relativity low temperatures. The condensation temperature alters the materials properties from polymer-like to carbon materials alongside their morphology and elemental ratio. This new method opens the possibility for the synthesis of new organic, photoactive carbon–nitrogen based frameworks at low calcination temperatures with great simplicity. Photodegradation experiments of methylene blue reveal that the obtained materials can perform dye reduction photochemically with visible photons, while at the same time the photogenerated holes oxidize the dye toward small molecular fragments.