English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

The nanoscale organization of the B lymphocyte membrane

MPS-Authors

Maity,  Palash Chandra
Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons191394

Yang,  Jianying
Research Group and Chair of Molecular Immunology of the University of Freiburg, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

Klaesener,  Kathrin
Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons191285

Reth,  Michael
Research Group and Chair of Molecular Immunology of the University of Freiburg, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Maity, P. C., Yang, J., Klaesener, K., & Reth, M. (2014). The nanoscale organization of the B lymphocyte membrane. Biochemica et Biophiysica Acta, 1853, 830-840.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-887D-E
Abstract
The fluid mosaic model of Singer and Nicolson correctly predicted that the plasma membrane (PM) forms a lipid bi-layer containing many integral transmembrane proteins. This model also suggested that most of these proteins were randomly dispersed and freely diffusing moieties. Initially, this view of a dynamic and rather unorganized membrane was supported by early observations of the cell surfaces using the light microscope. However, recent studies on the PM below the diffraction limit of visible light (~250nm) revealed that, at nanoscale dimensions, membranes are highly organized and compartmentalized structures. Lymphocytes are particularly useful to study this nanoscale membrane organization because they grow as single cells and are not permanently engaged in cell:cell contacts within a tissue that can influence membrane organization. In this review, we describe the methods that can be used to better study the protein:protein interaction and nanoscale organization of lymphocyte membrane proteins, with a focus on the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). Furthermore, we discuss the factors that may generate and maintain these membrane structures.