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Journal Article

Evolutionary implications of a third lymphocyte lineage in lampreys

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Schorpp,  Michael
Department of Developmental Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Boehm,  Thomas
Department of Developmental Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Hirano, M., Guo, P., McCurley, N., Schorpp, M., Das, S., Boehm, T., et al. (2013). Evolutionary implications of a third lymphocyte lineage in lampreys. Nature, 501, 435-438. doi:10.1038/nature12467.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-88DE-1
Abstract
Jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and jawless vertebrates (cyclostomes) have different adaptive immune systems. Gnathostomes use T- and B-cell antigen receptors belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Cyclostomes, the lampreys and hagfish, instead use leucine-rich repeat proteins to construct variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs), two types of which, VLRA and VLRB, are reciprocally expressed by lymphocytes resembling gnathostome T and B cells. Here we define another lineage of T-cell-like lymphocytes that express the recently identified VLRC receptors. Both VLRC+ and VLRA+ lymphocytes express orthologues of genes that gnathostome γδ and αβ T cells use for their differentiation, undergo VLRC and VLRA assembly and repertoire diversification in the 'thymoid' gill region, and express their VLRs solely as cell-surface proteins. Our findings suggest that the genetic programmes for two primordial T-cell lineages and a prototypic B-cell lineage were already present in the last common vertebrate ancestor approximately 500 million years ago. We propose that functional specialization of distinct T-cell-like lineages was an ancient feature of a primordial immune system.