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Journal Article

Presenilin-dependent Processing and Nuclear Function of γ-Protocadherins

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Haas,  Ingrid G.
Department of Molecular Embryology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Frank,  Marcus
Department of Molecular Embryology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Kemler,  Rolf
Emeritus Group: Molecular Embryology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Haas, I. G., Frank, M., Véron, N., & Kemler, R. (2005). Presenilin-dependent Processing and Nuclear Function of γ-Protocadherins. The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 280, 9313-9319.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-9331-C
Abstract
The recently described protocadherin gene clusters encode cadherin-related proteins, which are highly expressed in the vertebrate nervous system. Here, we report biochemical studies addressing proteolytic processing of γ-protocadherins. These type-I transmembrane proteins are cleaved by a metalloproteinase in vivo, generating a soluble extracellular fragment and a carboxyl-terminal fragment associated with the cellular membrane. In addition, we show that the carboxyl-terminal fragment is a substrate for further cleavage mediated by presenilin. Consequently, accumulation of the fragment is found when γ-secretase is inactivated either by the specific presenilin-inhibitor L685,458 or in double mutant murine embryonic fibroblasts lacking both presenilin genes. The γ-secretase-generated carboxyl-terminal fragment is largely unstable but accumulates when proteasomal degradation is inhibited. Interestingly, the proteolytic fragment generated by γ-secretase can localize to the nucleus. This is the first report providing experimental evidence for a cell surface receptor signaling function of protocadherins regulated by proteolytic events.