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Journal Article

Postnatal isl1+ cardioblasts enter fully differentiated cardiomyocyte lineages

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Reth,  Michael
Research Group and Chair of Molecular Immunology of the University of Freiburg, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Laugwitz, K.-L., Moretti, A., Lam, J., Gruber, P., Chen, Y., Woodard, S., et al. (2005). Postnatal isl1+ cardioblasts enter fully differentiated cardiomyocyte lineages. Nature, 433, 647-653.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-9335-4
Abstract
The purification, renewal and differentiation of native cardiac progenitors would form a mechanistic underpinning for unravelling steps for cardiac cell lineage formation, and their links to forms of congenital and adult cardiac diseases1-3. Until now there has been little evidence for native cardiac precursor cells in the postnatal heart4. Herein, we report the identification of isl1+ cardiac progenitors in postnatal rat, mouse and human myocardium. A cardiac mesenchymal feeder layer allows renewal of the isolated progenitor cells with maintenance of their capability to adopt a fully differentiated cardiomyocyte phenotype. Tamoxifen-inducible Cre/lox technology enables selective marking of this progenitor cell population including its progeny, at a defined time, and purification to relative homogeneity. Co-culture studies with neonatal myocytes indicate that isl1+ cells represent authentic, endogenous cardiac progenitors (cardioblasts) that display highly efficient conversion to a mature cardiac phenotype with stable expression of myocytic markers (25%) in the absence of cell fusion, intact Ca2+-cycling, and the generation of action potentials. The discovery of native cardioblasts represents a genetically based system to identify steps in cardiac cell lineage formation and maturation in development and disease.