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Adenosine and cAMP are potent inhibitors of the NF-κB pathway downstream of immunoreceptors

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Minguet,  Susanna
Research Group and Chair of Molecular Immunology of the University of Freiburg, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Huber,  Michael
Research Group and Chair of Molecular Immunology of the University of Freiburg, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Rosenkranz,  Lisa
Research Group and Chair of Molecular Immunology of the University of Freiburg, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Schamel,  Wolfgang W. A.
Research Group and Chair of Molecular Immunology of the University of Freiburg, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Reth,  Michael
Research Group and Chair of Molecular Immunology of the University of Freiburg, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Minguet, S., Huber, M., Rosenkranz, L., Schamel, W. W. A., Reth, M., & Brummer, T. (2005). Adenosine and cAMP are potent inhibitors of the NF-κB pathway downstream of immunoreceptors. European Journal of Immunology, 35, 31-41.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-93C6-F
Abstract
Anergic B lymphocytes exert compromised signal transduction towards the activation of NF-κB in response to B cell antigen receptor (BCR) triggering, whereas activation of the ERK pathway appears normal. How this differential down-regulation of the NF-κB pathway is regulated remains still elusive. Here, we demonstrate that stimuli known to enhance 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are capable of selectively suppressing the activation both of NF-κB downstream of the BCR and Toll-like receptor 4 in splenic B lymphocytes and of the high-affinity receptor for IgE in BM-derived mast cells. This suppression is accomplished by blocking phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of the inhibitor of NF-κB. A cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor reverses this suppressive effect, indicating that PKA is a downstream effector of cAMP in this process. Importantly, not only drugs that artificially elevate intracellular cAMP levels, but also the nucleoside adenosine, which is known to be a mediator of cellular distress, inhibit the NF-κB pathway. This suggests that adenosine-mediated signals represent an important step in the molecular decision process controlling inflammation versus anergic immune responses.