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Actin Organization in Cells Responding to a Perforated Surface, Revealed by Live Imaging and Cryo-Electron Tomography

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Jasnin,  Marion
Baumeister, Wolfgang / Molecular Structural Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Ecke,  Mary
Gerisch, Günther / Cell Dynamics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Baumeister,  Wolfgang
Baumeister, Wolfgang / Molecular Structural Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Gerisch,  Günther
Gerisch, Günther / Cell Dynamics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Jasnin, M., Ecke, M., Baumeister, W., & Gerisch, G. (2016). Actin Organization in Cells Responding to a Perforated Surface, Revealed by Live Imaging and Cryo-Electron Tomography. Structure, 24(7), 1031-1043. doi:10.1016/j.str.2016.05.004.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-1145-1
Abstract
In a 3D environment, motile cells accommodate their protruding and retracting activities to geometrical cues. Dictyostelium cells migrating on a perforated film explored its holes by forming actin rings around their border and extending protrusions through the free space. The response was initiated when an actin wave passed a hole, and the rings persisted only in the PIP3-rich territories surrounded by a wave. To reconstruct actin structures from cryo-electron tomograms, actin rings were identified by cryo-correlative light and electron microscopy, and thin wedges of relevant regions were obtained by cryo-focused ion-beam milling. Retracting stages were distinguished from protruding ones by the accumulation of myosin-II. Early actin rings consisted of filaments pointing upright from the membrane, entangled with a meshwork of filaments close to the membrane. Branches identified at later stages suggested that formin-based nucleation of filaments was followed by Arp2/3-mediated network stabilization, which prevented buckling of the force-generating filaments.