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Journal Article

Optimized digital filtering techniques for radiation detection with HPGe detectors

MPS-Authors
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Salathe,  M.
Division Prof. Dr. Manfred Lindner, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Kihm,  T.
Division Prof. Dr. Werner Hofmann, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

1504.02039.pdf
(Preprint), 422KB

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Citation

Salathe, M., & Kihm, T. (2016). Optimized digital filtering techniques for radiation detection with HPGe detectors. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, 808, 150-155. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2015.11.051.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-B3CD-7
Abstract
This paper describes state-of-the-art digital filtering techniques that are part of GEANA, an automatic data analysis software used for the GERDA experiment. The discussed filters include a novel, nonlinear correction method for ballistic deficits, which is combined with one of three shaping filters: a pseudo-Gaussian, a modified trapezoidal, or a modified cusp filter. The performance of the filters is demonstrated with a 762 g Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector, produced by Canberra, that measures {\gamma}-ray lines from radioactive sources in an energy range between 59.5 and 2614.5 keV. At 1332.5 keV, together with the ballistic deficit correction method, all filters produce a comparable energy resolution of ~1.61 keV FWHM. This value is superior to those measured by the manufacturer and those found in publications with detectors of a similar design and mass. At 59.5 keV, the modified cusp filter without a ballistic deficit correction produced the best result, with an energy resolution of 0.46 keV. It is observed that the loss in resolution by using a constant shaping time over the entire energy range is small when using the ballistic deficit correction method.