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Conference Paper

ROBAST: Development of a Non-Sequential Ray-Tracing Simulation Library and its Applications in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

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Okumura,  A.
Division Prof. Dr. James A. Hinton, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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1508.07803.pdf
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Citation

Okumura, A., Noda, K., & Rulten, C. (2015). ROBAST: Development of a Non-Sequential Ray-Tracing Simulation Library and its Applications in the Cherenkov Telescope Array. Proceedings of Science, ICRC2015: 951. Retrieved from http://arxiv.org/abs/1508.07803.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-0CFD-7
Abstract
We have developed a non-sequential ray-tracing simulation library, ROot-BAsed Simulator for ray Tracing (ROBAST), which is aimed for wide use in optical simulations of cosmic-ray (CR) and gamma-ray telescopes. The library is written in C++ and fully utilizes the geometry library of the ROOT analysis framework. Despite the importance of optics simulations in CR experiments, no open-source software for ray-tracing simulations that can be widely used existed. To reduce the unnecessary effort demanded when different research groups develop multiple ray-tracing simulators, we have successfully used ROBAST for many years to perform optics simulations for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Among the proposed telescope designs for CTA, ROBAST is currently being used for three telescopes: a Schwarzschild--Couder telescope, one of the Schwarzschild--Couder small-sized telescopes, and a large-sized telescope (LST). ROBAST is also used for the simulations and the development of hexagonal light concentrators that has been proposed for the LST focal plane. By fully utilizing the ROOT geometry library with additional ROBAST classes, building complex optics geometries that are typically used in CR experiments and ground-based gamma-ray telescopes is possible. We introduce ROBAST and show several successful applications for CTA.