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Conference Paper

Present and Future Optical-to-Microwave Synchronization Systems at REGAE Facility for Electron Diffraction and Plasma Acceleration Experiments

MPS-Authors
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Titberidze,  Mikheil
University of Hamburg, CFEL, Hamburg, Germany;
International Max Planck Research School for Ultrafast Imaging & Structural Dynamics (IMPRS-UFAST), Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Epp,  Sascha W.
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Titberidze, M., Grüner, F., Maier, A., Zeitler, B., Schlarb, H., Felber, M., et al. (2015). Present and Future Optical-to-Microwave Synchronization Systems at REGAE Facility for Electron Diffraction and Plasma Acceleration Experiments. In Proceedings of the 6th International Particle Accelerator Conference (pp. 833-836). Joint Accelerator Conferences Website (JACoW).


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-1601-2
Abstract
Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Explorations (REGAE) is a Radio Frequency (RF) driven linear accelerator. It uses frequency tripled short photon pulses (~ 35 fs) from the Titanium Sapphire (Ti:Sa.) Laser system in order to generate electron bunches from the photo-cathode. The electron bunches are accelerated up to ~ 5 MeV kinetic energy and compressed down to sub-10 fs using the so called ballistic bunching technique. REGAE currently is used for electron diffraction experiments (by Prof. R.J.D. Miller's Group). In near future within the collaboration of Laboratory for Laser- and beam-driven plasma Acceleration (LAOLA), REGAE will also be employed to externally inject electron bunches into laser driven linear plasma waves. Both experiments require very precise synchronization (sub-50 fs) of the photo-injector laser and RF reference. In this paper we present experimental results of the current and new optical to microwave synchronization systems in comparison. We also address some of the issues related to the current system and give an upper limit in terms of its long-term performance.