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Influence of the substrate material on the knife-edge based profiling of tightly focused light beams

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Huber,  C.
Interference Microscopy and Nanooptics, Leuchs Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Orlov,  S.
Interference Microscopy and Nanooptics, Leuchs Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Banzer,  P.
Interference Microscopy and Nanooptics, Leuchs Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Leuchs,  G.
Leuchs Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Huber, C., Orlov, S., Banzer, P., & Leuchs, G. (2016). Influence of the substrate material on the knife-edge based profiling of tightly focused light beams. OPTICS EXPRESS, 24(8), 8214-8227. doi:10.1364/OE.24.008214.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-62DD-9
Abstract
The performance of the knife-edge method as a beam profiling technique for tightly focused light beams depends on several parameters, such as the material and height of the knife-pad as well as the polarization and wavelength of the focused light beam under study. Here we demonstrate that the choice of the substrate the knife-pads are fabricated on has a crucial influence on the reconstructed beam projections as well. We employ an analytical model for the interaction of the knife-pad with the beam and report good agreement between our numerical and experimental results. Moreover, we simplify the analytical model and demonstrate, in which way the underlying physical effects lead to the apparent polarization dependent beam shifts and changes of the beamwidth for different substrate materials and heights of the knife-pad. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America