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Sensing Nanoparticles with a Cantilever-Based Scannable Optical Cavity of Low Finesse and Sub-lambda(3) Volume

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Hoffmann,  Bjoern
Micro- & Nanostructuring, Technology Development and Service Units, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Christiansen,  Silke
Christiansen Research Group, Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;
Micro- & Nanostructuring, Technology Development and Service Units, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Goetzinger,  Stephan
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Sandoghdar,  Vahid
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Kelkar, H., Wang, D., Martin-Cano, D., Hoffmann, B., Christiansen, S., Goetzinger, S., et al. (2015). Sensing Nanoparticles with a Cantilever-Based Scannable Optical Cavity of Low Finesse and Sub-lambda(3) Volume. Physical Review Applied, 4: 054010. doi:10.1103/PhysRevApplied.4.054010.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-634A-5
Abstract
We report on the realization of an open plane-concave Fabry-Perot resonator with a mode volume below lambda(3) at optical frequencies. We discuss some of the less-common features of this microcavity regime and show that the ultrasmall mode volume allows us to detect cavity resonance shifts induced by single nanoparticles even at quality factors as low as 100. Being based on low-reflectivity micromirrors fabricated on a silicon cantilever, our experimental arrangement provides broadband operation, tunability of the cavity resonance, and lateral scanning. These features are interesting for a range of applications including biochemical sensing, modification of photophysics, and optomechanical studies.