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Spectroscopic detection of single Pr3+ ions on the H-3(4)-D-1(2) transition

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Eichhammer,  Emanuel
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Utikal,  Tobias
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Goetzinger,  Stephan
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Sandoghdar,  Vahid
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Eichhammer, E., Utikal, T., Goetzinger, S., & Sandoghdar, V. (2015). Spectroscopic detection of single Pr3+ ions on the H-3(4)-D-1(2) transition. New Journal of Physics, 17: 083018. doi:10.1088/1367-2630/17/8/083018.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-6392-3
Abstract
Rare earth ions in crystals exhibit narrow spectral features and hyperfine-split ground states with exceptionally long coherence times. These features make them ideal platforms for quantum information processing in the solid state. Recently, we reported on the first high-resolution spectroscopy of single Pr3+ ions in yttrium orthosilicate nanocrystals via the H-3(4)-P-3(0) transition at a wavelength of 488 nm. Here we show that individual praseodymium ions can also be detected on the more commonly studied H-3(4)-D-1(2) transition at 606 nm. In addition, we present the first measurements of the second-order autocorrelation function, fluorescence lifetime, and emission spectra of single ions in this system as well as their polarization dependencies on both transitions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that by a proper choice of the crystallite, one can obtain narrower spectral lines and, thus, resolve the hyperfine levels of the excited state. We expect our results to make single-ion spectroscopy accessible to a larger scientific community.