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Experimental realization of an optical antenna designed for collecting 99% of photons from a quantum emitter

MPS-Authors
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Chu,  X. -L.
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Brenner,  T. J. K.
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Sandoghdar,  V.
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Götzinger,  S.
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Chu, X.-.-L., Brenner, T. J. K., Chen, X.-.-W., Ghosh, Y., Hollingsworth, J. A., Sandoghdar, V., et al. (2014). Experimental realization of an optical antenna designed for collecting 99% of photons from a quantum emitter. Optica, 1, 203-208. doi:10.1364/OPTICA.1.000203.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-648E-7
Abstract
A light source that emits single photons at well-defined times and into a well-defined mode would be a decisive asset for quantum information processing, quantum metrology, and sub-shot-noise detection of absorption. One of the central challenges in the realization of such a deterministic device based on a single quantum emitter concerns the collection of the photons, which are radiated into a 4 pi solid angle. Here, we present the fabrication and characterization of an optical antenna designed to convert the dipolar radiation of an arbitrarily oriented quantum emitter to a directional beam with more than 99% efficiency. Our approach is extremely versatile and can be used for more efficient detection of nanoscopic emitters ranging from semiconductor quantum dots to dye molecules, color centers, or rare-earth ions in various environments. Having addressed the issue of collection efficiency, we also discuss the photophysical limitations of the existing quantum emitters for the realization of a deterministic single-photon source. (C) 2014 Optical Society of America