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Tracking Single Particles on Supported Lipid Membranes: Multimobility Diffusion and Nanoscopic Confinement

MPS-Authors
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Hsieh,  Chia-Lung
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Spindler,  Susann
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Ehrig,  Jens
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Sandoghdar,  Vahid
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Hsieh, C.-L., Spindler, S., Ehrig, J., & Sandoghdar, V. (2014). Tracking Single Particles on Supported Lipid Membranes: Multimobility Diffusion and Nanoscopic Confinement. The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 118, 1545-1554. doi:10.1021/jp412203t.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-6643-E
Abstract
Supported lipid bilayers have been studied intensively over the past two decades. In this work, we study the diffusion of single gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with diameter of 20 nm attached to GM1 ganglioside or DOPE lipids at different concentrations in supported DOPC bilayers. The indefinite photostability of GNPs combined with the high sensitivity of interferometric scattering microscopy (iSCAT) allows us to achieve 1.9 nm spatial precision at 1 ms temporal resolution, while maintaining long recording times. Our trajectories visualize strong transient confinements within domains as small as 20 nm, and the statistical analysis of the data reveals multiple mobilities and deviations from normal diffusion. We present a detailed analysis of our findings and provide interpretations regarding the effect of the supporting substrate and GM1 clustering. We also comment on the use of high-speed iSCAT for investigating diffusion of lipids, proteins, or viruses in lipid membranes with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution.