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Reconfigurable Optothermal Microparticle Trap in Air-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

MPS-Authors
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Schmidt,  O. A.
International Max Planck Research School, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;
Russell Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Garbos,  M. K.
Russell Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Euser,  T. G.
Russell Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Russell,  P. St. J.
Russell Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Schmidt, O. A., Garbos, M. K., Euser, T. G., & Russell, P. S. J. (2012). Reconfigurable Optothermal Microparticle Trap in Air-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber. PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, 109(2): 024502. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.024502.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-68B5-B
Abstract
We report a novel optothermal trapping mechanism that occurs in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. In the confined environment of the core, the motion of a laser-guided particle is strongly influenced by the thermal-gradient- driven flow of air along the core surface. Known as "thermal creep flow,'' this can be induced either statically by local heating, or dynamically by the absorption (at a black mark placed on the fiber surface) of light scattered by the moving particle. The optothermal force on the particle, which can be accurately measured in hollow-core fiber by balancing it against the radiation forces, turns out to exceed the conventional thermophoretic force by 2 orders of magnitude. The system makes it possible to measure pN-scale forces accurately and to explore thermally driven flow in micron-scale structures.