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Optomechanical Self-Channeling of Light in a Suspended Planar Dual-Nanoweb Waveguide

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Butsch,  A.
Russell Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Conti,  C.
Russell Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Biancalana,  F.
Biancalana Research Group, Research Groups, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Russell,  P. St J.
Russell Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Butsch, A., Conti, C., Biancalana, F., & Russell, P. S. J. (2012). Optomechanical Self-Channeling of Light in a Suspended Planar Dual-Nanoweb Waveguide. PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, 108(9): 093903. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.093903.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-68E5-1
Abstract
It is shown that optomechanical forces can cause nonlinear self-channeling of light in a planar dual-slab waveguide. A system of two parallel silica nanowebs, spaced similar to 100 nm and supported inside a fiber capillary, is studied theoretically and an iterative scheme developed to analyze its nonlinear optomechanical properties. Steady-state field distributions and mechanical deformation profiles are obtained, demonstrating that self-channeling is possible in realistic structures at launched powers as low as a few mW. The differential optical nonlinearity of the self-channeled mode can be as much as 10 x 10(6) times higher than the corresponding electronic Kerr nonlinearity. It is also intrinsically broadband, does not utilize resonant effects, can be viewed as a consequence of the extreme nonlocality of the mechanical response, and in fact is a notable example of a so-called accessible soliton.