English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Seeding growth approach to gold nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 10 to 80 nanometers in organic solvent

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons140015

Stanglmair,  Christoph
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons76043

Scheeler,  Sebastian
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons75927

Pacholski,  Claudia
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Biophysical Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany;

Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Stanglmair, C., Scheeler, S., & Pacholski, C. (2014). Seeding growth approach to gold nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 10 to 80 nanometers in organic solvent. European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, 23, 3633-3637. doi:10.1002/ejic.201402467.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-AA4D-6
Abstract
To accommodate the high demand for gold nanoparticles, which is generated by the extraordinary optical properties of plasmonic metamaterials, a focus has been placed on their large-scale synthesis for several years. In this work, a simple method for the preparation of nearly monodisperse gold nanoparticles with diameters of up to 80 nm is presented. For this purpose, gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 9 nm were synthesized in toluene by using oleylamine both as a reducing and stabilizing agent. These gold nanoparticles act as seeds for a subsequent growth reaction in which the same precursors are slowly added to the reaction vessel. During the reaction, the gold nanoparticles start to agglomerate when they reach a certain size (ca. 20 nm). Despite their agglomeration, they can be grown further without impairing their size distribution or morphology. The gold nanoparticle agglomerates can be separated by stabilization with thiol-terminated polystyrene.