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Plasmon coupling in self-assembled gold nanoparticle-based honeycomb islands

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Scheeler,  Sebastian
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Ullrich,  Simon
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Pacholski,  Claudia
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Biophysical Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany;

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Citation

Scheeler, S., Mühlig, S., Rockstuhl, C., Bin Hasan, S., Ullrich, S., Neubrech, F., et al. (2013). Plasmon coupling in self-assembled gold nanoparticle-based honeycomb islands. The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 117(36), 18634-18641. doi:10.1021/jp405560t.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0018-C3BE-C
Abstract
Metallic nanostructures that sustain plasmonic resonances are indispensable ingredients for many functional devices. Whereas structures fabricated with top-down methods entail the advantage of a nearly unlimited control over all plasmonic properties, they are in most cases unsuitable for a low cost fabrication on large surfaces; and eventually a truly nanometric size domain is difficult to reach due to limitations in the fabrication resolution. Although ordinary bottom-up techniques based on colloidal nanolithography promise to lift these limitations, they often suffer from their incapability to self-assemble nanoparticles at large surfaces and at a density necessary to observe effects that strongly deviate from those of isolated nanoparticles. Here, we rely on the application of sequential bottom-up fabrication steps to realize honeycomb structures from gold nanoparticles that show strong extinction bands in the near-infrared. The extraordinary properties are only facilitated by densely packing the nanoparticles into clusters with a finite size; causing the clusters to act as plasmonic macromolecules. These strongly interacting bottom-up materials with a deterministic geometry but fabricated by self-assembly might be of use in future sensing applications and in material platforms to mediate strong light–matter-interactions.