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Impact of order and disorder in RGD nanopatterns on cell adhesion

MPS-Authors
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Gräter,  Stefan
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Corbellini,  Francesca
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Rinck,  Sabine
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Bock,  Eva
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Biophysical Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany;

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Kemkemer,  Ralf
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Spatz,  Joachim P.
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Biophysical Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany;

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Citation

Huang, J., Gräter, S., Corbellini, F., Rinck, S., Bock, E., Kemkemer, R., et al. (2009). Impact of order and disorder in RGD nanopatterns on cell adhesion. Nano Letters, 9(3), 1111-1116. doi:10.1021/nl803548b.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-3DA9-6
Abstract
We herein present a novel platform of well-controlled ordered and disordered nanopatterns positioned with a cyclic peptide of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) on a bioinert poly(ethylene glycol) background, to study whether the nanoscopic order of spatial patterning of the integrin-specific ligands influences osteoblast adhesion. This is the first time that the nanoscale order of RGD ligand patterns was varied quantitatively, and tested for its impact on the adhesion of tissue cells. Our findings reveal that integrin clustering and such adhesion induced by RGD ligands is dependent on the local order of ligand arrangement on a substrate when the global average ligand spacing is larger than 70 nm; i.e., cell adhesion is "turned off" by RGD nanopattern order and "turned on" by the RGD nanopattern disorder if operating at this range of interligand spacing.