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Microtubule gliding and crosslinked microtubule networks on micro-pillar interfaces

MPG-Autoren
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Roos,  Wouter
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Ulmer,  Jens
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Gräter,  Stefan
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Spatz,  Joachim P.
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Biophysical Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany;

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Zitation

Roos, W., Ulmer, J., Gräter, S., Surrey, T., & Spatz, J. P. (2005). Microtubule gliding and crosslinked microtubule networks on micro-pillar interfaces. Nano Letters, 5(12), 2630-2634. doi:10.1021/nl051865j.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-493E-2
Zusammenfassung
We combined biochemical and topographical patterning to achieve motor-driven microtubule gliding on top of microfabricated pillar arrays with limited and controllable surface interactions of gliding microtubules. Kinesins immobilized on pillar heads pushed microtubules from the top of one micropillar to the next bridging up to 20 μm deep gaps filled with buffer solution. Distances of more than 10 μm were by-passed, and microtubule buckling was occasionally observed. The velocity distributions of microtubules gliding on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) pillars, on flat PDMS, and on glass were found to be different, most likely due to topological and/or chemical differences between the substrates. We also used pillar arrays to suspend cross-linked microtubule networks, whose structural characteristics were governed by the topographical characteristics of the pillar pattern. These experiments open new possibilities to study the dynamics and the self-organization of motor/microtubule networks in defined topologically structured environments.