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Journal Article

Eye blinking as addressee feedback in face-to-face conversation

MPS-Authors
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Hömke,  Paul
Language and Cognition Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
INTERACT, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
International Max Planck Research School for Language Sciences, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Holler,  Judith
Language and Cognition Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;
INTERACT, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Communication in Social Interaction, Radboud University Nijmegen, External Organizations;

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Levinson,  Stephen C.
Language and Cognition Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;
Linguistics Department, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands;
INTERACT, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (public)

Hömke_Holler_Levinson_2017.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Hoemke_etal_2017_Eye blinking.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)

hrls_a_1262143_sm7955.docx
(Supplementary material), 891KB

Supp.materials_2.mov
(Supplementary material), 30MB

Supp.materials_3a.mp4
(Supplementary material), 24MB

Supp.materials_3b.mp4
(Supplementary material), 64MB

Supp.materials_4.mp4
(Supplementary material), 46MB

Supp.materials_5.mp4
(Supplementary material), 25MB

Citation

Hömke, P., Holler, J., & Levinson, S. C. (2017). Eye blinking as addressee feedback in face-to-face conversation. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 50, 54-70. doi:10.1080/08351813.2017.1262143.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-20AD-F
Abstract
Does blinking function as a type of feedback in conversation? To address this question, we built a corpus of Dutch conversations, identified short and long addressee blinks during extended turns, and measured their occurrence relative to the end of turn constructional units (TCUs), the location where feedback typically occurs. Addressee blinks were indeed timed to the end of TCUs. Also, long blinks were more likely than short blinks to occur during mutual gaze, with nods or continuers, and their occurrence was restricted to sequential contexts in which signaling understanding was particularly relevant, suggesting a special signaling capacity of long blinks.