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The influence of flow and motion in MRI of diffusion using a modified CE-FAST sequence.

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Merboldt,  K. D.
Research Group of Biomedical NMR, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Hänicke,  W.
Research Group of Biomedical NMR, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Gyngell,  M.L.
Research Group of Biomedical NMR, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Frahm,  J.
Research Group of Biomedical NMR, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Bruhn,  H.
Research Group of Biomedical NMR, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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2376697.pdf
(Publisher version), 650KB

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Citation

Merboldt, K. D., Hänicke, W., Gyngell, M., Frahm, J., & Bruhn, H. (1989). The influence of flow and motion in MRI of diffusion using a modified CE-FAST sequence. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 12(2), 198-208. doi:10.1002/mrm.1910120206.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-29A0-5
Abstract
Severe motion and flow artifacts are a problem in MRI of diffusion in vivo due to the application of strong magnetic field gradients. Here it is shown that image artifacts can be removed by using a modified fast-scan MRI sequence (CE-FAST) in conjunction with averaging of diffusion-weighted images. In phantom studies slow (coherent) flow (<1 mm s-1) in the presence of strong diffusion gradients is shown to cause signal losses in diffusion-weighted images that depend on the relative orientations of the flow direction and the diffusion gradient. On the other hand, pulsatile motions of macroscopic dimensions (e.g. 1 mm, 1 Hz, in-plane) lead to smearing and ghosting of signal intensities along the phase-encoding direction of the images. In both phantoms and rabbit brains in vivo motion artifacts were found to be reducible by averaging 8-16 images. Unfortunately. the resulting image contrast no longer represents a “true” diffusion contrast but is affected by additional signal losses due to motion averaging. All experiments were performed on a 40-cm-borc 2.35-T Bruker Medspee system.