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Localization and evolution of putative triose phosphate translocators in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

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Ullrich,  Kristian K.
Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Genome Biol Evol-2015-Moog-2955-69.pdf
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Citation

Moog, D., Rensing, S. A., Archibald, J. M., Maier, U. G., & Ullrich, K. K. (2015). Localization and evolution of putative triose phosphate translocators in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Genome Biology and Evolution, 7(11), 2955-2969. doi:10.1093/gbe/evv190.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-2CD0-3
Abstract
The establishment of a metabolic connection between host and symbiont is a crucial step in the evolution of an obligate endosymbiotic relationship. Such was the case in the evolution of mitochondria and plastids. Whereas the mechanisms of metabolite shuttling between the plastid and host cytosol are relatively well studied in Archaeplastida-organisms that acquired photosynthesis through primary endosymbiosis-little is known about this process in organisms with complex plastids. Here, we focus on the presence, localization, and phylogeny of putative triose phosphate translocators (TPTs) in the complex plastid of diatoms. These proteins are thought to play an essential role in connecting endosymbiont and host metabolism via transport of carbohydrates generated by the photosynthesis machinery of the endosymbiont. We show that the complex plastid localized TPTs are monophyletic and present a model for how the initial metabolic link between host and endosymbiont might have been established in diatoms and other algae with complex red plastids and discuss its implications on the evolution of those lineages.