English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Integrin-mediated mechanotransduction

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons78772

Sun,  Zhiqi
Fässler, Reinhard / Molecular Medicine, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons202629

Guo,  Shengzhen S.
Fässler, Reinhard / Molecular Medicine, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons77945

Fässler,  Reinhard
Fässler, Reinhard / Molecular Medicine, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Sun, Z., Guo, S. S., & Fässler, R. (2016). Integrin-mediated mechanotransduction. The Journal of Cell Biology: JCB, 215(4), 445-456. doi:10.1083/jcb.201609037.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-5FE2-4
Abstract
Cells can detect and react to the biophysical properties of the extracellular environment through integrin-based adhesion sites and adapt to the extracellular milieu in a process called mechanotransduction. At these adhesion sites, integrins connect the extracellular matrix (ECM) with the F-actin cytoskeleton and transduce mechanical forces generated by the actin retrograde flow and myosin II to the ECM through mechanosensitive focal adhesion proteins that are collectively termed the "molecular clutch." The transmission of forces across integrin-based adhesions establishes a mechanical reciprocity between the visco-elasticity of the ECM and the cellular tension. During mechanotransduction, force allosterically alters the functions of mechanosensitive proteins within adhesions to elicit biochemical signals that regulate both rapid responses in cellular mechanics and long-term changes in gene expression. Integrin-mediated mechanotransduction plays important roles in development and tissue homeostasis, and its dysregulation is often associated with diseases.