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Journal Article

Ultrafast reversal of the ferroelectric polarization

MPS-Authors
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Mankowsky,  R.
Quantum Condensed Matter Dynamics, Condensed Matter Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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von Hoegen,  A.
Quantum Condensed Matter Dynamics, Condensed Matter Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Först,  M.
Quantum Condensed Matter Dynamics, Condensed Matter Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Cavalleri,  A.
Quantum Condensed Matter Dynamics, Condensed Matter Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory;

External Resource
Fulltext (public)

PhysRevLett.118.197601.pdf
(Publisher version), 662KB

Supplementary Material (public)

Supplementary.pdf
(Supplementary material), 2MB

Citation

Mankowsky, R., von Hoegen, A., Först, M., & Cavalleri, A. (2017). Ultrafast reversal of the ferroelectric polarization. Physical Review Letters, 118: 197601. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.197601.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-5D6C-9
Abstract
The ability to manipulate ferroelectrics at ultrafast speeds has long been an elusive target for materials research. By using short optical pulses to coherently displace all atoms along the ferroelectric mode, witching times could be shortened by two orders of magnitude compared to what is possible with pulsed electric fields. Here, we report on the demonstration of ultrafast optical reversal of the ferroelectric polarization in LiNbO3. Rather than driving the ferroelectric mode directly, we couple to it indirectly by exciting an auxiliary high-frequency vibration. The ferroelectric polarization is then reversed due to the anharmonic coupling between the two modes, as revealed by time-resolved, phase-sensitive second-harmonic generation. Reversal can be induced in both directions, a key pre-requisite for practical applications.