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The mechanism of Li2S activation in lithium-sulfur batteries: Can we avoid the polysulfide formation?

MPG-Autoren
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Chabanne,  Laurent
Tim Fellinger, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Antonietti,  Markus
Markus Antonietti, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Fellinger,  Tim-Patrick
Tim Fellinger, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Vizintin, A., Chabanne, L., Tchernychova, E., Arčon, I., Stievano, L., Aquilanti, G., et al. (2017). The mechanism of Li2S activation in lithium-sulfur batteries: Can we avoid the polysulfide formation? Journal of Power Sources, 344, 208-217. doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2017.01.112.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-8055-8
Zusammenfassung
Electrochemical reactions in the Lisingle bondS batteries are considered as a multistep reaction process with at least 2–3 equilibrium states. Here we report a possibility of having a conversion of Li2S into sulfur without detectible formation of polysulfides. That was confirmed by using a novel material system consisting of carbon coated Li2S particles prepared by carbothermal reduction of Li2SO4. Two independent in operando measurements showed direct oxidation of Li2S into sulfur for this system, with almost negligible formation of polysulfides at potentials above 2.5 V vs. Li/Li+. Our results link the diversity of first charge profiles in the literature to the Li2S oxidation mechanism and show the importance of ionic wiring within the material. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Li2S oxidation mechanism depends on the relative amount of soluble sulfur in the electrolyte. By controlling the type and the amount of electrolyte within the encapsulating carbon shell, it is thereby possible to control the reaction mechanism of Li2S activation.