English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Competing impact of anthropogenic emissions and meteorology on the distribution of trace gases over Indian region

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons187753

Ojha,  N.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Ansari, T. U., Ojha, N., Chandrasekar, R., Balaji, C., Singh, N., & Gunthe, S. S. (2016). Competing impact of anthropogenic emissions and meteorology on the distribution of trace gases over Indian region. Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, 73(4), 363-380. doi:10.1007/s10874-016-9331-y.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-8B1B-3
Abstract
The spatial distribution of trace gases exhibit large spatial heterogeneity over the Indian region with an elevated pollution loading over densely populated Gangetic Plains (IGP). The contending role and importance of anthropogenic emissions and meteorology in deciding the trace gases level and distribution over Indian region, however, is poorly investigated. In this paper, we use an online regional chemistry transport model (WRF/Chem) to simulate the spatial distribution of trace gases over Indian region during one representative month of only three meteorological seasons namely winter, spring/summer and monsoon. The base simulation, using anthropogenic emissions from SEAC(4)RS inventory, is used to simulate the general meteorological conditions and the realistic spatial distribution of trace gases. A sensitivity simulation is conducted after removing the spatial heterogeneity in the anthropogenic emissions, i.e., with spatially uniform emissions to decouple the role of anthropogenic emissions and meteorology and their role in controlling the distribution of trace gases over India. The concentration levels of Ozone, CO, SO2 and NO2 were found to be lower over IGP when the emissions are uniform over India. A comparison of the base run with the sensitivity run highlights that meteorology plays a dominant role in controlling the spatial distribution of relatively longer-lived species like CO and secondary species like Ozone while short-lived species like NOX and SO2 are predominantly controlled by the spatial variability in anthropogenic emissions over the Indian region.