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Global atmospheric budget of simple monocyclic aromatic compounds

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Cabrera-Perez,  D.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Taraborrelli,  D.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Sander,  R.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101196

Pozzer,  A.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Cabrera-Perez, D., Taraborrelli, D., Sander, R., & Pozzer, A. (2016). Global atmospheric budget of simple monocyclic aromatic compounds. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, 16.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-8C0E-A
Abstract
The global atmospheric budget and distribution of monocyclic aromatic compounds is estimated, using an atmospheric chemistry general circulation model. Simulation results are evaluated with an ensemble of surface and aircraft observations with the goal of understanding emission, production and removal of these compounds. Anthropogenic emissions provided by the RCP database represent the largest source of aromatics in the model (a parts per thousand integral aEuro-23aEuro-TgCaEuro-year(-1)) and biomass burning from the GFAS inventory the second largest (a parts per thousand integral aEuro-5aEuro-TgCaEuro-year(-1)). The simulated chemical production of aromatics accounts for a parts per thousand integral aEuro-5aEuro-TgCaEuro-year(-1). The atmospheric burden of aromatics sums up to 0.3aEuro-TgC. The main removal process of aromatics is photochemical decomposition (a parts per thousand integral aEuro-27aEuro-TgCaEuro-aEuro-year(-1)), while wet and dry deposition are responsible for a removal of a parts per thousand integral aEuro-4aEuro-TgCaEuro-year(-1). Simulated mixing ratios at the surface and elsewhere in the troposphere show good spatial and temporal agreement with the observations for benzene, although the model generally underestimates mixing ratios. Toluene is generally well reproduced by the model at the surface, but mixing ratios in the free troposphere are underestimated. Finally, larger discrepancies are found for xylenes: surface mixing ratios are not only overestimated but also a low temporal correlation is found with respect to in situ observations.