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Beating the standard sensitivity-bandwidth limit of cavity-enhanced interferometers with internal squeezed-light generation

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Ast,  Stefan
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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1702.01044.pdf
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Citation

Korobko, M., Kleybolte, L., Ast, S., Miao, H., Chen, Y., & Schnabel, R. (2017). Beating the standard sensitivity-bandwidth limit of cavity-enhanced interferometers with internal squeezed-light generation. Physical Review Letters, 118: 143601. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.143601.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-A9FE-E
Abstract
The shot-noise limited peak sensitivity of cavity-enhanced interferometric measurement devices, such as gravitational-wave detectors, can be improved by increasing the cavity finesse, even when comparing fixed intra-cavity light powers. For a fixed light power inside the detector, this comes at the price of a proportional reduction in the detection bandwidth. High sensitivity over a large span of signal frequencies, however, is essential for astronomical observations. It is possible to overcome this standard sensitivity-bandwidth limit using non-classical correlations in the light field. Here, we investigate the internal squeezing approach, where the parametric amplification process creates a non-classical correlation directly inside the interferometer cavity. We analyse the limits of the approach theoretically, and measure 36% increase in the sensitivity-bandwidth product compared to the classical case. To our knowledge this is the first experimental demonstration of an improvement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product using internal squeezing, opening the way for a new class of optomechanical force sensing devices.