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Layer- and cell-type-specific suprathreshold stimulus representation in rat primary somatosensory cortex

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de Kock,  Christiaan
Department of Cell Physiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Bruno,  Randy M.
Department of Cell Physiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Spors,  Hartwig
Department of Cell Physiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Sakmann,  Bert
Department of Cell Physiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

de Kock, C., Bruno, R. M., Spors, H., & Sakmann, B. (2007). Layer- and cell-type-specific suprathreshold stimulus representation in rat primary somatosensory cortex. The Journal of Physiology - London, 581(1), 139-154. doi:10.1113/jphysiol.2006.124321.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-AE3C-5
Abstract
Sensory stimuli are encoded differently across cortical layers and it is unknown how response characteristics relate to the morphological identity of responding cells. We therefore juxtasomally recorded action potential (AP) patterns from excitatory cells in layer (L) 2/3, L4, L5 and L6 of rat barrel cortex in response to a standard stimulus (e.g. repeated deflection of single whiskers in the caudal direction). Subsequent single-cell filling with biocytin allowed for post hoc identification of recorded cells. We report three major conclusions. First, sensory-evoked responses were layer- and cell-type-specific but always < 1 AP per stimulus, indicating low AP rates for the entire cortical column. Second, response latencies from L4, L5B and L6 were comparable and thus a whisker deflection is initially represented simultaneously in these layers. Finally, L5 thick-tufted cells dominated the cortical AP output following sensory stimulation, suggesting that these cells could direct sensory guided behaviours.