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Entropy Evolution in the Magnetic Phases of Partially Frustrated CePdAl

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Lucas,  S.
Physics of Quantum Materials, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Huang,  C.-L.
Physics of Correlated Matter, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Wunderlich,  S.
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Stockert,  O.
Physics of Correlated Matter, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Lucas, S., Grube, K., Huang, C.-L., Sakai, A., Wunderlich, S., Green, E. L., et al. (2017). Entropy Evolution in the Magnetic Phases of Partially Frustrated CePdAl. Physical Review Letters, 118(10): 107204, pp. 1-5. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.107204.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-DF91-D
Abstract
In the heavy-fermion metal CePdAl, long-range antiferromagnetic order coexists with geometric frustration of one-third of the Ce moments. At low temperatures, the Kondo effect tends to screen the frustrated moments. We use magnetic fields B to suppress the Kondo screening and study the magnetic phase diagram and the evolution of the entropy with B employing thermodynamic probes. We estimate the frustration by introducing a definition of the frustration parameter based on the enhanced entropy, a fundamental feature of frustrated systems. In the field range where the Kondo screening is suppressed, the liberated moments tend to maximize the magnetic entropy and strongly enhance the frustration. Based on our experiments, this field range may be a promising candidate to search for a quantum spin liquid.