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Domain-general mechanisms for speech segmentation: The role of duration information in language learning

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Monaghan,  Padraic
Lancaster University;
Research Associates, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Frost_Monaghan_Tatsumi_2017.pdf
(Publisher version), 279KB

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Citation

Frost, R. L. A., Monaghan, P., & Tatsumi, T. (2017). Domain-general mechanisms for speech segmentation: The role of duration information in language learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 43(3), 466-476. doi:10.1037/xhp0000325.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-088C-F
Abstract
Speech segmentation is supported by multiple sources of information that may either inform language processing specifically, or serve learning more broadly. The Iambic/Trochaic Law (ITL), where increased duration indicates the end of a group and increased emphasis indicates the beginning of a group, has been proposed as a domain-general mechanism that also applies to language. However, language background has been suggested to modulate use of the ITL, meaning that these perceptual grouping preferences may instead be a consequence of language exposure. To distinguish between these accounts, we exposed native-English and native-Japanese listeners to sequences of speech (Experiment 1) and nonspeech stimuli (Experiment 2), and examined segmentation using a 2AFC task. Duration was manipulated over 3 conditions: sequences contained either an initial-item duration increase, or a final-item duration increase, or items of uniform duration. In Experiment 1, language background did not affect the use of duration as a cue for segmenting speech in a structured artificial language. In Experiment 2, the same results were found for grouping structured sequences of visual shapes. The results are consistent with proposals that duration information draws upon a domain-general mechanism that can apply to the special case of language acquisition