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Tuning selectivity of electrochemical reactions by atomically dispersed platinum catalyst

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Choi,  Chang Hyuck
Electrocatalysis, Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Society;

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Mayrhofer,  Karl J. J.
Helmholtz-Institute Erlangen-Nuremberg for Renewable Energy (IEK-11), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen, Germany;
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91058 Erlangen, Germany ;
Electrocatalysis, Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Choi, C. H., Kim, M., Kwon, H. C., Cho, S. J., Yun, S., Kim, H.-T., et al. (2016). Tuning selectivity of electrochemical reactions by atomically dispersed platinum catalyst. Nature Communications, 7: 10922. doi:10.1038/ncomms10922.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-286F-F
Abstract
Maximum atom efficiency as well as distinct chemoselectivity is expected for electrocatalysis on atomically dispersed (or single site) metal centres, but its realization remains challenging so far, because carbon, as the most widely used electrocatalyst support, cannot effectively stabilize them. Here we report that a sulfur-doped zeolite-templated carbon, simultaneously exhibiting large sulfur content (17 wt% S), as well as a unique carbon structure (that is, highly curved three-dimensional networks of graphene nanoribbons), can stabilize a relatively high loading of platinum (5 wt%) in the form of highly dispersed species including site isolated atoms. In the oxygen reduction reaction, this catalyst does not follow a conventional four-electron pathway producing H2O, but selectively produces H2O2 even over extended times without significant degradation of the activity. Thus, this approach constitutes a potentially promising route for producing important fine chemical H2O2, and also offers opportunities for tuning the selectivity of other electrochemical reactions on various metal catalysts.