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Effects of alcohol on spontaneous neuronal oscillations: A combined magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography study

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Zitation

Nikulin, V. V., Nikulina, A. V., Yamashita, H., Rossi, E. M., & Kähkönnen, S. (2005). Effects of alcohol on spontaneous neuronal oscillations: A combined magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography study. Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 29(5), 687-693. doi:10.1016/j.pnpbp.2005.04.014.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-416F-9
Zusammenfassung
Electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) can detect different aspects of alcohol effects on auditory processing measured with event-related potentials and magnetic fields. The present study aimed to detect alcohol-induced changes in spontaneous neuronal oscillations with combined EEG and MEG techniques. The effects of alcohol on spontaneous neuronal rhythms were studied in 12 healthy subjects after 0.8 g/kg alcohol or juice in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design using simultaneous high-resolution MEG and EEG in eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. The data were analyzed with a power spectral density analysis. MEG recording showed that alcohol significantly increased the relative power of alpha rhythm (8–10 Hz) and reduced the relative power of beta activity (17–25 Hz) in both left and right hemispheres, but only in the eyes-closed condition. These effects did not depend on gender. No analogous statistically significant changes were observed in EEG rhythms. However, the power of alpha and beta rhythms was positively correlated in MEG and EEG recordings, indicating that MEG and EEG reflect similar processes. A distinct sensitivity of MEG and EEG to the sources of cortical oscillations, a better signal-to-noise ratio of MEG, as well as strong spatial blurring of potentials in EEG are most likely the reasons for the observed differences in the effects of alcohol on spontaneous oscillations as detected with two methods.