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Structure and in situ organisation of the Pyrococcus furiosus archaellum machinery

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Daum,  Bertram
Department of Structural Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;
Living Systems Institute, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom;
College of Physics, Engineering and Physical Science, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom;

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Vonck,  Janet
Department of Structural Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Kühlbrandt,  Werner
Department of Structural Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Daum, B., Vonck, J., Bellack, A., Chaudhury, P., Reichelt, R., Albers, S.-V., et al. (2017). Structure and in situ organisation of the Pyrococcus furiosus archaellum machinery. eLife, 6: e27470. doi:10.7554/eLife.27470.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-A8B2-E
Abstract
The archaellum is the macromolecular machinery that Archaea use for propulsion or surface adhesion, enabling them to proliferate and invade new territories. The molecular composition of the archaellum and of the motor that drives it appears to be entirely distinct from that of the functionally equivalent bacterial flagellum and flagellar motor. Yet, the structure of the archaellum machinery is scarcely known. Using combined modes of electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM), we have solved the structure of the Pyrococcus furiosus archaellum filament at 4.2 Å resolution and visualise the architecture and organisation of its motor complex in situ. This allows us to build a structural model combining the archaellum and its motor complex, paving the way to a molecular understanding of archaeal swimming motion.