English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Paper

Atmospheric chemistry, sources and sinks of carbon suboxide, C3O2

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons204323

Keßel,  S.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons203199

Cabrera-Perez,  D.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101013

Horowitz,  A.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons104367

Veres,  P. R.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101233

Sander,  R.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101304

Taraborrelli,  D.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101324

Tucceri,  M. E.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons100898

Crowley,  J. N.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101196

Pozzer,  A.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101331

Vereecken,  L.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101104

Lelieveld,  J.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101364

Williams,  J.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Keßel, S., Cabrera-Perez, D., Horowitz, A., Veres, P. R., Sander, R., Taraborrelli, D., et al. (2017). Atmospheric chemistry, sources and sinks of carbon suboxide, C3O2. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, 17.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-ADEB-4
Abstract
Carbon suboxide, O  =  C  =  C  =  C  =  O, has been detected in ambient air samples and has the potential to be a noxious pollutant and oxidant precursor; however, its lifetime and fate in the atmosphere are largely unknown. In this work, we collect an extensive set of studies on the atmospheric chemistry of C3O2. Rate coefficients for the reactions of C3O2 with OH radicals and ozone were determined as kOH =  (2.6 ± 0.5)  ×  10−12 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 at 295 K (independent of pressure between  ∼  25 and 1000 mbar) and kO3  <  1.5  ×  10−21 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 at 295 K. A theoretical study on the mechanisms of these reactions indicates that the sole products are CO and CO2, as observed experimentally. The UV absorption spectrum and the interaction of C3O2 with water (Henry's law solubility and hydrolysis rate constant) were also investigated, enabling its photodissociation lifetime and hydrolysis rates, respectively, to be assessed. The role of C3O2 in the atmosphere was examined using in situ measurements, an analysis of the atmospheric sources and sinks and simulation with the EMAC atmospheric chemistry–general circulation model. The results indicate sub-pptv levels at the Earth's surface, up to about 10 pptv in regions with relatively strong sources, e.g. influenced by biomass burning, and a mean lifetime of  ∼  3.2 days. These predictions carry considerable uncertainty, as more measurement data are needed to determine ambient concentrations and constrain the source strengths.