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Impaired autonomic regulation of resistance arteries in mice with low vascular endothelial growth factor or upon vascular endothelial growth factor trap delivery

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Rohrer,  H.
Developmental Neurobiology Group, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Storkebaum, E., de Almodovar, C. R., Meens, M., Zacchigna, S., Mazzone, M., Vanhoutte, G., et al. (2010). Impaired autonomic regulation of resistance arteries in mice with low vascular endothelial growth factor or upon vascular endothelial growth factor trap delivery. Circulation, 122(3), 273-281.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-1D30-0
Abstract
Background-Control of peripheral resistance arteries by autonomic nerves is essential for the regulation of blood flow. The signals responsible for the maintenance of vascular neuroeffector mechanisms in the adult, however, remain largely unknown. Methods and Results-Here, we report that VEGF(partial derivative/partial derivative) mice with low vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels suffer defects in the regulation of resistance arteries. These defects are due to dysfunction and structural remodeling of the neuroeffector junction, the equivalent of a synapse between autonomic nerve endings and vascular smooth muscle cells, and to an impaired contractile smooth muscle cell phenotype. Notably, short-term delivery of a VEGF inhibitor to healthy mice also resulted in functional and structural defects of neuroeffector junctions. Conclusions-These findings uncover a novel role for VEGF in the maintenance of arterial neuroeffector function and may help us better understand how VEGF inhibitors cause vascular regulation defects in cancer patients. (Circulation. 2010; 122: 273-281.)