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Tuned SMC Arms Drive Chromosomal Loading of Prokaryotic Condensin

MPG-Autoren
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Bürmann,  Frank
Gruber, Stephan / Chromosome Organization and Dynamics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Basfeld,  Alrun
Gruber, Stephan / Chromosome Organization and Dynamics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Diebold-Durand,  Marie-Laure
Gruber, Stephan / Chromosome Organization and Dynamics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons188776

Wilhelm,  Larissa
Gruber, Stephan / Chromosome Organization and Dynamics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Gruber,  Stephan
Gruber, Stephan / Chromosome Organization and Dynamics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Volltexte (frei zugänglich)

PIIS1097276517300527.pdf
(Verlagsversion), 4MB

Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)

Bürmann_mmc1.pdf
(Ergänzendes Material), 5MB

mmc2.xlsx
(Ergänzendes Material), 306KB

mmc3.xlsx
(Ergänzendes Material), 34KB

mmc4.xlsx
(Ergänzendes Material), 7KB

Zitation

Bürmann, F., Basfeld, A., Nunez, R. V., Diebold-Durand, M.-L., Wilhelm, L., & Gruber, S. (2017). Tuned SMC Arms Drive Chromosomal Loading of Prokaryotic Condensin. Molecular Cell, 65(5), 861-872.e9. doi:10.1016/j.molcel.2017.01.026.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-0027-D
Zusammenfassung
SMC proteins support vital cellular processes in all domains of life by organizing chromosomal DNA. They are composed of ATPase "head" and "hinge" dimerization domains and a connecting coiled-coil "arm." Binding to a kleisin subunit creates a closed tripartite ring, whose similar to 47-nm-long SMC arms act as barrier for DNA entrapment. Here, we uncover another, more active function of the bacterial Smc arm. Using high-throughput genetic engineering, we resized the arm in the range of 6-60 nm and found that it was functional only in specific length regimes following a periodic pattern. Natural SMC sequences reflect these length constraints. Mutants with improper arm length or peptide insertions in the arm efficiently target chromosomal loading sites and hydrolyze ATP but fail to use ATP hydrolysis for relocation onto flanking DNA. We propose that SMC arms implement force transmission upon nucleotide hydrolysis to mediate DNA capture or loop extrusion.