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Journal Article

Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between soils and atmosphere under various CO2 concentrations

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Behrendt,  Thomas
Department Biogeochemical Processes, Prof. S. E. Trumbore, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

BGC2691.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)

BGC2691s1.pdf
(Supplementary material), 374KB

BGC2691s2.xlsx
(Supplementary material), 91KB

Citation

Bunk, R., Behrendt, T., Yi, Z., Andreae, M. O., & Kesselmeier, J. (2017). Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between soils and atmosphere under various CO2 concentrations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, 122(6), 1343-1358. doi:10.1002/2016JG003678.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-E76A-7
Abstract
A new continuous integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer and an automated soil chamber system were used to investigate the exchange processes of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between soils and the atmosphere under laboratory conditions. The exchange patterns of OCS between soils and the atmosphere were found to be highly dependent on soil moisture and ambient CO2 concentration. With increasing soil moisture, OCS exchange ranged from emission under dry conditions to an uptake within an optimum moisture range, followed again by emission at high soil moisture. Elevated CO2 was found to have a significant impact on the exchange rate and direction as tested with several soils. There is a clear tendency toward a release of OCS at higher CO2 levels (up to 7600 ppm), which are typical for the upper few centimeters within soils. At high soil moisture, the release of OCS increased sharply. Measurements after chloroform vapor application show that there is a biotic component to the observed OCS exchange. Furthermore, soil treatment with the fungi inhibitor nystatin showed that fungi might be the dominant OCS consumers in the soils we examined. We discuss the influence of soil moisture and elevated CO2 on the OCS exchange as a change in the activity of microbial communities. Physical factors such as diffusivity that are governed by soil moisture also play a role. Comparing KM values of the enzymes to projected soil water CO2 concentrations showed that competitive inhibition is unlikely for carbonic anhydrase and PEPCO but might occur for RubisCO at higher CO2 concentrations.