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Photochemical Water Splitting by Bismuth Chalcogenide Topological Insulators

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Rajamathi,  Catherine R.
Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Kumar,  Nitesh
Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Yang,  Hao
Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Sun,  Yan
Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Shekhar,  Chandra
Chandra Shekhar, Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Yan,  Binghai
Binghai Yan, Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Felser,  Claudia
Claudia Felser, Inorganic Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Rajamathi, C. R., Gupta, U., Pal, K., Kumar, N., Yang, H., Sun, Y., et al. (2017). Photochemical Water Splitting by Bismuth Chalcogenide Topological Insulators. ChemPhysChem, 18(17), 2322-2327. doi:10.1002/cphc.201700344.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-F585-9
Abstract
As one of the major areas of interest in catalysis revolves around 2D materials based on molybdenum sulfide, we have examined the catalytic properties of bismuth selenides and tellurides, which are among the first chalcogenides to be proven as topological insulators (TIs). We find significant photochemical H-2 evolution activity with these TIs as catalysts. H-2 evolution increases drastically in nanosheets of Bi2Te3 compared to single crystals. First-principles calculations show that due to the topology, surface states participate and promote the hydrogen evolution.