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Journal Article

Membrane tension increases fusion efficiency of model membranes in the presence of SNAREs.

MPS-Authors
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Turco,  L.
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Halder,  P.
Department of Neurobiology, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Tarantola,  M.
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Jahn,  R.
Department of Neurobiology, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

2483837.pdf
(Publisher version), 4MB

Supplementary Material (public)

2483837_Suppl.pdf
(Supplementary material), 4MB

Citation

Kliesch, T. T., Dietz, J., Turco, L., Halder, P., Polo, E., Tarantola, M., et al. (2017). Membrane tension increases fusion efficiency of model membranes in the presence of SNAREs. Scientific Reports, 7: 12070. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-12348-w.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-FCE5-C
Abstract
The large gap in time scales between membrane fusion occurring in biological systems during neurotransmitter release and fusion observed between model membranes has provoked speculations over a large number of possible factors that might explain this discrepancy. One possible reason is an elevated lateral membrane tension present in the presynaptic membrane. We investigated the tension-dependency of fusion using model membranes equipped with a minimal fusion machinery consisting of syntaxin 1, synaptobrevin and SNAP 25. Two different strategies were realized; one based on supported bilayers and the other one employing sessile giant liposomes. In the first approach, isolated patches of planar bilayers derived from giant unilamellar vesicles containing syntaxin 1 and preassembled SNAP 25 (ΔN-complex) were deposited on a dilatable PDMS sheet. In a second approach, lateral membrane tension was controlled through the adhesion of intact giant unilamellar vesicles on a functionalized surface. In both approaches fusion efficiency increases considerably with lateral tension and we identified a threshold tension of 3.4 mN m−1, at which the number of fusion events is increased substantially.