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Caring cooperators and powerful punishers: Differential effects of induced care and power motivation on different types of economic decision making

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Chierchia,  Gabriele
Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Parianen Lesemann,  Franca H.
Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Singer,  Tania
Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Chierchia_Parianen-Lesemann_2017.pdf
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Citation

Chierchia, G., Parianen Lesemann, F. H., Snower, D., Vogel, M., & Singer, T. (2017). Caring cooperators and powerful punishers: Differential effects of induced care and power motivation on different types of economic decision making. Scientific Reports, 7: 11068. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-11580-8.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-FD51-1
Abstract
Standard economic theory postulates that decisions are driven by stable context-insensitive preferences, while motivation psychology suggests they are driven by distinct context-sensitive motives with distinct evolutionary goals and characteristic psycho-physiological and behavioral patterns. To link these fields and test how distinct motives could differentially predict different types of economic decisions, we experimentally induced participants with either a Care or a Power motive, before having them take part in a suite of classic game theoretical paradigms involving monetary exchange. We show that the Care induction alone raised scores on a latent factor of cooperation-related behaviors, relative to a control condition, while, relative to Care, Power raised scores on a punishment-related factor. These findings argue against context-insensitive stable preferences and theories of strong reciprocity and in favor of a motive-based approach to economic decision making: Care and Power motivation have a dissociable fingerprint in shaping either cooperative or punishment behaviors.