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Intracellular Oceanospirillales inhabit the gills of the hydrothermal vent snail Alviniconcha with chemosynthetic, gamma-Proteobacterial symbionts

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Dubilier,  N.
Department of Symbiosis, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Beinart, R., Nyholm, S., Dubilier, N., & Girguis, P. (2014). Intracellular Oceanospirillales inhabit the gills of the hydrothermal vent snail Alviniconcha with chemosynthetic, gamma-Proteobacterial symbionts. Environmental Microbiology Reports, 6(6): 1, pp. 656-664.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-C4CC-C
Abstract
Associations between bacteria from the -Proteobacterial order Oceanospirillales and marine invertebrates are quite common. Members of the Oceanospirillales exhibit a diversity of interactions with their various hosts, ranging from the catabolism of complex compounds that benefit host growth to attacking and bursting host nuclei. Here, we describe the association between a novel Oceanospirillales phylotype and the hydrothermal vent snail Alviniconcha. Alviniconcha typically harbour chemoautotrophic - or epsilon-Proteobacterial symbionts inside their gill cells. Via fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy, we observed an Oceanospirillales phylotype (named AOP for AlviniconchaOceanospirillales phylotype') in membrane-bound vacuoles that were separate from the known - or epsilon-Proteobacterial symbionts. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we surveyed 181 Alviniconcha hosting -Proteobacterial symbionts and 102 hosting epsilon-Proteobacterial symbionts, and found that the population size of AOP was always minor relative to the canonical symbionts (median 0.53% of the total quantified 16S rRNA genes). Additionally, we detected AOP more frequently in Alviniconcha hosting -Proteobacterial symbionts than in those hosting epsilon-Proteobacterial symbionts (96% and 5% of individuals respectively). The high incidence of AOP in -Proteobacteria hosting Alviniconcha implies that it could play a significant ecological role either as a host parasite or as an additional symbiont with unknown physiological capacities.