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Bacterial community structure and dissolved organic matter in repeatedly flooded subsurface karst water pools

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Niggemann,  J.
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Dittmar,  T.
Marine Geochemistry Group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Pernthaler,  J.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Shabarova, T., Villiger, J., Morenkov, O., Niggemann, J., Dittmar, T., & Pernthaler, J. (2014). Bacterial community structure and dissolved organic matter in repeatedly flooded subsurface karst water pools. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 89: 1, pp. 111-126.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-C57A-8
Abstract
Bacterial diversity, community assembly, and the composition of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) were studied in three temporary subsurface karst pools with different flooding regimes. We tested the hypothesis that microorganisms introduced to the pools during floods faced environmental filtering toward a ‘typical’ karst water community, and we investigated whether DOM composition was related to floodings and the residence time of water in stagnant pools. As predicted, longer water residence consistently led to a decline of bacterial diversity. The microbial assemblages in the influx water harbored more ‘exotic’ lineages with large distances to known genotypes, yet these initial communities already appeared to be shaped by selective processes. β-Proteobacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) closely related to microbes from subsurface or surface aquatic environments were mainly responsible for the clustering of samples according to water residence time in the pools. By contrast, several Cytophagaceae and Flavobacteriaceae OTUs were related to different floodings, which were also the main determinants of DOM composition. A subset of compounds distinguishable by molecular mass and O/C content were characteristic for individual floods. Moreover, there was a transformation of DOM in stagnant pools toward smaller and more aromatic compounds, potentially also reflecting microbial utilization.